Employers: Improve Employee Loyalty in the Post ACA World

by Kevin K. Johnson, Certified Senior Advisor (CSA)®

As the Affordable Care Act was coming on line last year, I spoke to a number of employers who suggested that the health benefit plans they offered to their employees were really instruments of competitive advantage. These employers felt that their employees selected to work for their respective company’s, in part, based upon the quality of the health care plan. I thought that was extremely interesting. In my experience, the only employees that actually compare benefits prior to applying to or accepting a job, are those employees that had to address a ‘special-needs’ situation in their immediate family. By far this is a much smaller subset of employees.

Well with the running implementation of the Affordable Care Act, employers might consider another benefit that will provide real value to the majority of their employees. This one has application to a broader employee base and can provide comparative competitive advantage versus other companies that might be competing for great employees.

Addressing the Primary Needs of Working Caregivers

Managing both work life and family life has become a major issue for a large and growing number of family caregivers and their employers. With the aging of the Baby Boom generation will come a dramatic increase in the long-term care needs of our population. As policy-makers consider our options for meeting these needs, supporting working caregivers takes on national importance.” – Margaret Neal and Donna Wagner

There are four areas of need that have implications for structuring workplace settings and providing support for caregivers:Exhausted Business Woman_PM2

  1. Flexibility
  2. Information and assistance
  3. Emotional Support and
  4. Tangible assistance

FLEXIBILITY
Employed caregivers routinely note the importance of both flexible work hours and being able to take unscheduled time off to handle caregiving responsibilities when needed. A recent study of working “sandwich generation” couples (e.g. those raising depending children and caring for aged parents) found that couples who felt they had work schedule flexibility experienced less work-family conflict. Work schedule flexibility and other work-based supports offered by employers to their employed caregivers have generally been perceived positively on the part of the caregivers. This, in turn, has led to increased loyalty and satisfaction with those employers.

INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE
The needs of employed caregivers vary according to the care situation and the needs of the care recipient. Regardless, however, just as do their non-employed counterparts, employed caregivers need information on the community services that are available to support the needs of elders. Most caregivers of elders have had little or no previous experience either with providing care to an elder or with negotiating the aging services system. Thus, information about caregiving, health conditions, and where to turn for help is a critical need for employed caregivers. Because of the complexity of many elders’ health care situations, employed caregivers, like other caregivers, can find it difficult to know even what is needed, let alone decide which service approach is best for their elder. Professional expertise can be invaluable for assessing the elder’s needs, providing referrals and advice, determining eligibility and payment options, and packaging the needed services.

EMOTIONAL SUPPORT
Emotional support for employed caregivers can come in the form of support from co-workers and supervisors at the workplace, support from other family members, and support from friends. A recent study found that, not surprisingly, lower levels of family related supervisor support were associated with higher levels of work-family conflict. Similarly, a less supportive workplace culture was also associated with work-family
conflict.

TANGIBLE ASSISTANCE
Employed caregivers need help with legal, financial, and health insurance matters and the paperwork associated with these. Helping an elder manage the paperwork associated with his or her medical care is a daunting task. Similarly, securing and completing the legal forms for durable power of attorney, wills, reverse mortgages, and the like can be frustrating and time-consuming.

Adding assistance with eldercare benefits that apply to most of your employee base can provide real competitive advantage versus other companies that are competing for great employees; including employees that are currently on your staff. In the process you can differentiate your company from your competition in a way that is really important to your workforce. Caring Concierge can help you create an affordable, elder care benefit program that makes sense for your company.

Referral: University of Wisconsin

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